It's easy to think that the price of a shed depends on the physical dimensions and the choice of external cladding and other fittings. In reality this is far from the truth. There are two things that will significantly affect your shed frame and hence the price -

Your ShedSales quote will detail the frames you need if your shed is to comply with the Australian Engineering Standards. ShedSales will optimise your portal frame to give you the most cost effective frame that still meets the engineering requirements.

When discussing the details of your shed frames with shed salesmen, here are some definitions that help you unterstand the language used.

Glossary of shed frame terms

Portal frame – the main frames of the building consisting of at least 2 columns and at least one rafter.

Column – the vertical posts of the portal frame that connect to a footing at the base and the rafter at the top.  If there is a wall it will be supported by columns.

Rafter – the part of the portal frame that supports theroof. For a gable roof each portal frame will have 2 rafters that connect together at the apex. The bottom of each rafter connects to the top of its column.

End wall internal column  – the vertical columns in between the end wall portal frame columns for the purpose of supporting a wall that runs in the same plane as the portal frame.  These columns are usually not required if there is no end wall.

Purlins – the secondary frames that carry the roof cladding and run the full length of the shed. Purlins are attached to the rafters with a bolted or screwed connection.

Eave Purlin  – the purlin that is at the eave.  It supports the roof cladding edge and the top of the wall cladding.  The gutter is attached to the top of the wall cladding.

Girts – the secondary frames that carry the wallcladding. Girts are attached to thecolumns.

Side wall girts  – the girts that run the full length of the shed below the eave purlin. They are connected to the portal frame columns.

End wall girts  – the girts that run along the end wall under the rafters.  They are connected to the end portal frame columns and the end wall internal columns.

Knee brace  – a strut frame that spreads the load on the "column to rafter" connection over a larger part of the top of the column and the bottom of the rafter.  Knee braces are often not required.

Apex brace  (or apex tie) – a frame that spreads the load on the "rafter to rafter" connection at the apex over a larger part of the rafter.  Apex braces are almost never used on smallerframes because it is always more cost effective to use heavier rafters.

diagram of shed frames

Portal frames (columns and rafters)